Blake Snow

writer-for-hire, content guy, bestselling author

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Tagged diet

How to eat healthy on a budget

Over the last 18 months, my family has doubled down on a mostly vegetarian, part-time vegan diet. We eat meat only once or twice a month, usually on holidays or special occasions. Same goes for desserts, usually on major holidays or birthdays.

Since my wife doesn’t like eggs, which is one of the best affordable superfoods, we eat a lot of oatmeal (boiled and baked), beans and rice, veggie pastas, lentils, peanuts, mixed nuts, hummus, big green salads, popcorn, oils instead butter, yogurt, macaroni and cheese, and plain ole carrots. We eat fruits in moderation, usually bananas, apples, and whatever’s in season.

Since becoming mostly vegan, I have never felt better. But I’ve also learned that eating healthy doesn’t have to be bland or expensive. In fact, I think we spend less on home cooked meals now than we did before, which really helps since the cost of food has skyrocketed over the last few years.

Either way, I love food more than ever and it feels great to feel better while still enjoying it.

See also: 26 secrets to eating healthy on a budget

10 habits for a healthy relationship with food

After recently learning that a family member was suffering from an eating disorder, I read Intuitive Eating, aka “The Gold Standard For a Healthy Relationship with Food.” I really appreciated the no-nonsense advice and wanted to summarize its 10, medically backed strategies for a sustainable diet:

  1. Reject dieting (no counting calories)
  2. Honor hunger (it knows the right amount)
  3. Make peace with food (give yourself unconditional permission to eat)
  4. Challenge the food police (ie “protein is the best food group”)
  5. Feel your fullness (listen and ask yourself if you are comfortably full)
  6. Discover the satisfaction of eating (which naturally causes us to eat less)
  7. Cope with your feelings without using food (stay away from food until feeling is managed)
  8. Respect your body (get rid of scale, don’t be overly critical about its shape)
  9. Exercise: feel the difference (focus on how you feel working out, not calorie burning)
  10. Honor your health with gentle nutrition (make food choices that make you feel well—it’s what you eat over time that matters.)

Brilliant!

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Why some people don’t eat pork

An estimated quarter of the world’s population doesn’t eat pork—mostly for religious but also for vegetarian reasons. Why?

“Islam and Judaism both originated in a region where pigs were scavengers and rooted through garbage to survive,” explains Jeff Dege on Quora. “They were unclean in every sense in that environment.”

On the other hand, Western civilizations are more accustom to non-scavenger or otherwise domesticated pigs that aren’t as infected as the ones the Middle East grew up with.

“If I lived in the Middle East 1500–200 years ago, I wouldn’t have eaten pig, either,” concludes Dege. “But I don’t and the reasons for avoiding it then and there don’t apply here and now.”

Which explains why the other three quarters of the world happily consume pork, mostly for barbecue, bacon, sausage, and chop reasons.

On a personal note, I rank edible animal muscle as follows—beef > poultry > pork > fish—but I try to limit my intake of it to no more than 2-3 times a week in favor of produce.

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More than just a buzzword: Top 10 superfoods backed by science

Courtesy Highbrow

Courtesy Highbrow

In the early 1900s, bananas may have been named the world’s first superfood. At the time, even The American Medical Association praised them for being “sealed by nature in practically germ-proof packages.”*

Although still one of the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat, bananas are no longer consider a superfood. (I eat one every morning, however, as they’re always in season). Trendy things like acai berries, green tea, quinoa, kale and other manufactured foods are. It’s gotten so out of hand, that the FDA issued a warning letter recently about falsely advertised “superfoods.” As of 2007, the European Union has prohibited food makers from using the term “superfood.”

So how can we distinguish marketing hype from science when seeking out nutrient-rich foods? Highbrow did just that recently. This is what they came up with—the top 10 superfoods backed by science.  Continue reading…

Weight is a lousy motivator for long-term health. Find a real cause today.

blake-first-marathonIf you’re happy with your health, nutrition and self-image, skip to the next post. If not, read on.

In nine years of marriage, Lindsey and I have never owned a weight scale. Not one.

Why? Because they’re superficial, largely meaningless, and a lousy motivator of long-term health. Continue reading…