Blake Snow

writer-for-hire, content guy, bestselling author

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Tagged weather

How to change the weather to your liking

Courtesy Shutterstock

No one can predict the weather. But you can bend it to your will sometimes. Here’s how:

  1. Fly to a different climate. This is the most expensive option but arguably the most effective. Hop on a flight and enjoy a totally new season in mere hours.
  2. Go swimming. The most fun, if not affordable option. Only works in summer. Bonus points for making you feel like a kid again.
  3. Condition your air. Ya know—jack up the A/C, turn up the heat, start a fan, light a fire. Within a few minutes, you can reverse the outside weather.
  4. Head for cover. This is the fastest, might time-tested option. Could be an umbrella, under the shade of a tree, or cozy shelter. In life and in bad weather, there is no place like home.
  5. Change your attire. This may be the most overlooked, if not easiest option. In many cases, there’s no such thing as a weather problem, only an attire problem (i.e. you over or underdressed for the elements).

How you like them, life hacks?

5 reasons America has the most catastrophic weather in the world

The United States leads the world in weather catastrophes, reports the Associated Press. The result is a whole lot more tornados, hurricane, flash floods, droughts, wildfires, blizzards, and sever thunderstorms when compared to other continents.

We can blame our unlucky geography for this, specifically these five things:

  1. We are flanked by the two biggest oceans. This really messes with our air conditions.
  2. A third “ocean basin” lies beneath us. It’s called the Gulf of Mexico and it further upends our overhead atmosphere.
  3. The Rocky Mountain west. These mammoths trap air, hold it, which causes storms to build then explode as they move east.
  4. Jutting peninsulas like Florida. We’d have a lot fewer hurricanes if it weren’t for this landmass trap more air.
  5. Clashing storm fronts along the jet stream. When combined, this further brews nasty weather.

And there you have it. Land of the free. Home of the brave. Leader of the free world. And the nastiest place for inclement weather. God bless the USA.

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W​hat Oklahoma tornadoes​ taught me about survival

An Oklahoma tornado courtesy of Shutterstock

Before moving to Georgia in my adolescence, I lived in Stillwater, Oklahoma for the first 12 years of my childhood. It was a wonderful place to grow up as a boy.

There were flat streets for my brother and I to skateboard all around town, lots of arcades for us and our friends to dump quarters into, and fishing at Theta Pond. Oh, and chili cheese dogs on Washington Street.

But there was also a harrowing threat of living in Oklahoma, especially in the summer. That’s because the state is home to more tornadoes than any other place in the world—right smack in the middle of Tornado Alley. And I distinctly remember many close encounters with them, if not once every other summer.

My first memory of a tornado was watching a slow and calming funnel cloud form directly over my house on Admiral Street. It was this giant, swirling, but graceful thing that looked like it could explode into a tornado at any moment. My family and I all watched from the front street. No one said it, but I’m sure all of us we’re thinking: “Please don’t touch down. Please.” We didn’t run because it wasn’t violent looking, and the sirens hadn’t gone off yet. In other words, when you live in Oklahoma, you learn to live with the threat of tornadoes every summer. And you don’t scramble for cover or storm shelters until you can feel, observe, and hear that something violent is about to happen. Continue reading…

I frackin’ love summer.

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Earlier this morning, I drove to the store to get gas for Lindsey — she was running late and still getting ready for an upcoming appointment with the girls. I walk outside, and I’m greeted with the warm blanket and smell of liberty that is summer weather. I love it.

Last weekend, I helped chaperone a youth camp in Eden, Utah for 10 boys and nine girls (a deflated tubeing ride pictured). Notice the contrast of the bluish lake, the rolling green hills, the snow-caped mountains, and clear sky in the background. Beautiful, not to mention the 85 degree weather the group enjoyed that day.

So if I had to rank my favorite seasons, they would be as follows: 1) Summer, by a long shot; 2) Fall; 3) Spring; and 4) Winter, a very distant fourth (I say “boo” to you, cold weather). What’s your favorite time of the year?