Blake Snow

content advisor, recognized journalist, bodacious writer-for-hire

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Tagged programming

Everyone who works with computers should read this (i.e. everyone should read this)

whatiscode

Credit: Business Week

I recently read Paul Ford’s special report on software—all 36,000 words and three hours of it. If you work in computers, you should read it. If you work in business, you should read it. If you’re an adult human, you will learn a lot about the way things are and where they’re headed by reading it.

Admittedly, the story could have benefitted from some additional editing. Ford, after all, veers a little off topic. But like Bill Bryson, Ford is a master at explaining why things matter—in this case, why coders matter, and how they will increasingly influence the future.

If that’s doesn’t convince you to read the article’s entirety, maybe my 10 favorite excerpts will:  Continue reading…

Now with 100% more over-air HD TV

HDTV
Lindsey and I finally pulled the plug last week on our basic Comcast cable package, one that cost $14/month for 30 channels (plus the four HD network stations). The Discovery and Travel channel will be missed, as ESPN has been in my house for two years now, but the picture quality and available channels of over-the-air TV never ceases to amaze me.

Using $13 dollar rabbit ears purchased from Best Buy, we now get 17 digital channels (excluding Spanish and complete trash programming), eight of which are broadcast in splended high-definition (CBS, ABC, NBC, FOX, PBS, CW, KJZZ, and PBS 2). Fortunately for the sports addict in me, I at least get the later rounds of all major tournaments, as they are always broadcasted on the four network stations.

Now all we need is free wi-max, the soon-to-be announced free PS3 to DVR firmware, and I’ll be set. Anyone else in the room enjoying over-the-air HD?