Blake Snow

content advisor, recognized journalist, bodacious writer-for-hire

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Tagged Atari

This retro documentary is fun, moving, and almost as good as King of Kong

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My wife and I watched Atari: Game Over last night on YouTube (part II here). It’s an hour long documentary about the fast rise and even faster demise of video games in the early ’80s and the misinformation surrounding their fall (the games, not the decade).

That’s just the pretext, however. The documentary is really about hurtful group think, toxic urban legends, and the unfair, if not tragic, treatment of Howard Warshaw, a talented and pioneering game designer that was ostracized for his largely innocent role.

Although the documentary handles some weighty baggage, director Zak Penn keeps it fun, fast-paced, and peppered with likable characters. When Warshaw is partially redeemed by the end of the movie, I was rattled with sympathy.

Atari: Game Over isn’t as fist-pumping fun as Kong of Kong, which you should watch posthaste if you haven’t already. But the former is more accurate and just as endearing. Furthermore, it challenges the viewer to scrutinize their beliefs before accepting them and encourages us to give others the benefit of the doubt.

Five stars out of five.

MSNBC: Top 5 best Atari games

It’s almost impossible to hear the word “Atari” and not reminisce on joysticks, paddle controllers, stick-men animation, beeps and blips and countless gaming classics. If it weren’t for Atari, there probably wouldn’t be Nintendo, PlayStation, or Xbox – at least as we know them.

While arcade hits make up the lion’s share of popular games found on Atari systems, original favorites also call the platform home. Wooden-panel consoles, we salute you with the best Atari games.

Continue reading at MSNBC…

EDGE: 5 Ways to Jumpstart Atari

Much like a stolen car, Atari has been gutted and sold for its parts over the years. It has changed ownership numerous times since its formation in 1972 and was recently delisted from the NASDAQ stock exchange amid near-financial ruin. It’s embattled, confused, and has few prospects other than its recognizable name. So how can the world’s first videogame publisher turn itself around? Here are five common sense ways:

Continue reading at Edge…