Blake Snow

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TRAVEL: New 7 wonders of the world

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In 2007, an international body polled more than 100 million people to name their favorite, man-made monument from a list of 200 nominees. After all the votes were counted, these were named the winners—aka the “New 7 Wonders of the World.”


Built in 600 A.D., Chichen Itza is an ancient Mayan ruin located in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula (about a two hour drive from Cancun) and stars the 365-step El Castillo.

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Completed in 1644, the Great Wall of China is the longest building in the world (over 1,200 miles) and is best seen from either Jinshanling (pictured) or Mutianyu (closer to Beijing).

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Finished in 1931, the Christ the Redeemer statue stands 125 feet tall on top of a 2,300 foot mountain in beautiful Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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Erected in 1648 and located in northern India, The Taj Mahal is a masterpiece of ivory symmetry and one of the world’s greatest architectural achievements.

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Built in 1450 by the Inca, the “Lost City” of Machu Picchu sits high in the Andes Mountains of Peru and was later “discovered” in 1911 by American explorer Hiram Bingham.

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Completed by the Nabateans in 300 B. C., the “Rose City” of Petra, Jordan is accessed via a narrow slot canyon (Al Siq) and features several rock-facade buildings, most notably The Treasury.


Finished in 80 A.D., The Colosseum in Rome, Italy is the largest amphitheater ever built and formerly was used to showcase gladiator fights, hunting shows, and public executions.


BONUS: Built in 2,500 B.C., The Pyramids of Giza in Cairo are three standouts of hundreds found in Egypt and were awarded honorary “wonder” status for being the only surviving monuments from the ancient world.

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