Blake Snow

content advisor, recognized journalist, bodacious writer-for-hire

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Tagged travel

Traveling with children: 5 questions with a travel columnist and father of five

I was interviewed recently by The Atlantic about traveling with children, as an enthusiast of both endeavors. This is what I said:

Should parents forgo enrolling their children in summer school in favor of travel?

“While classwork is important, I haven’t encountered any evidence suggesting it’s more educational than actual travel,” says Blake Snow, a father of five, avid traveler, and author of Log Off: How to Stay Connected after Disconnecting. “In fact, the opposite is true; travel is a wonderful mechanism for educating kids both big and small.” (NOTE: My politically incorrect answer would be an enthusiastic, “Hell yes, you should, and maybe don’t ever send them to summer school unless they’re really behind!)

Do you worry about your children’s safety while traveling?

“I do, but not to the point of preventing us from visiting places that the State Department deems safe,” says Snow. “We’ve even gone to places with special advisories, such as Mexico and South Africa, so long as the alerts are no worse than ‘be extra careful.’ The world really is a lot safer than our irrational fears make it out to be, but I do believe in taking precautions and trusting what the State Departments says when it comes to keeping American safe while abroad.”  Continue reading…

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Published works: Finding Europe in North America, Log Off coverage, 25 mood boosters

Courtesy Quebec Tourism

With exception to my non-bylined writing for Fortune 500 companies, here’s what I published this month, mostly related to my new book:

Media coverage for my new book, Log Off:

Thanks for reading and sharing what you liked.

Published works: My first book, European biking cruises, writing for hometown papers

Excluding non-bylined writing for commercial clients, here’s what I published this month:

  • Log Off, my first book! Landing page here, Kindle here, paperback here. Thanks for considering it.
  • Why you should bike on your next European river cruise. Written for Frommer’s after a wonderful 8-day biking cruise with my 11-year old daughter.
  • Coming home to Carrollton. Op-ed I wrote for my former hometown paper.

Printed version below for those behind a paywall. Continue reading…

World travel: 7 things to do on 7 continents

Credit: National Geographic

What luck we have. Not only were we born on the most marvelous planet in the observable universe—not to mention the only habitable one out of gazillions—but the one we did inherit has seven distinct, magnificent continents.

Picking just one experience from each that best personifies the greater landmass is an impossible job, not to mention totally unfair. But life isn’t fair. Nor is this column. If you need someplace to start when attempting to bag all seven continents, make it one of these iconic and universally well-rated encounters.  Continue reading…

HOW TO HOPE: 10 ways to feed your faith so your fears will starve

Credit: Blake Snow

My wife and I believe the world is inherently good and we want to indoctrinate our children to think the same. Not by ignoring society’s seedy underbelly. But with measurable evidence such as this that overwhelmingly proves the world is getting better and better.

To that end, my wife shared the following quote with our children and I over breakfast recently: “Feed your faith and your fear will starve.” In other words, people who are afraid are usually consumed by doubt.

But in my experience, we can replace that fear and doubt with hope and love by doing the following:  Continue reading…

Published works: The greatest Utah wilderness you’ve never heard of

Courtesy Clay Wood

I just published my first story for Frommers, the storied travel guide magazine that changed the way Americans traveled in 1957 after Arthur Frommer published his seminal Europe on 5 Dollars a Day.

My story isn’t that big nor will it make nearly as many waves, but I’m still proud of it and the friends that made it possible by joining me recently on a weekend backpacking trip into the High Uinta Wilderness, which I deem “the best western wilderness you’ve never heard of.”

Hope you enjoy it.

Published works: Starting anew with my very best travel columns

Courtesy Lindsey Snow

Last month, Paste Magazine unexpectedly and suddenly shuttered their travel section and (along with it) my weekly column. After 126 consecutive and wonderful stories, the news was devastating.

More than just money (which admittedly wasn’t much), the perk-filled gig served as a weekly source of education, inspiration, and a renewed understanding of writing for mainstream audiences again. Furthermore, it took me and sometimes even my friends and family to five different continents, dozens of countries, countless destinations, and introduced me to hundreds of interesting people.

Although I’ve yet to find a replacement, I have some promising leads for the unpublished and upcoming articles in the pipe. And I’m determined and confident that I’ll be able to find a new suitor for my column, which was read by over 900,000 monthly individuals, according to a November 2016 estimate by the nation’s fourth largest tourism board (i.e. Visit Orlando).

Until then, here are the stories I am most proud of—the best of my travel column so far:  Continue reading…

Published works: Electric car camping in The Rockies, Alaskan cruises, the future of work

Courtesy Chevrolet/Barry Staver

Excluding non-bylined commercial work, here’s what I published last month:

Published works: Forces of nature, why do we travel, where to avoid this summer

Excluding non-bylined commercial work, here’s where my travel column went last month:

See also: My best work to date. Thanks for reading!

Published works: New tech, great outdoors, why we overlook Puerto Rico

Courtesy Puerto Rico tourism

Excluding non-bylined stories written for commercial clients (i.e. the bulk of my work these days), here’s what I published last month:

Published works: The future of TV, film tourism, first time in Hawaii, Trump’s #1 hotel

Excluding non-bylined stories for my commercial clients, this is what I published last month:

Thanks for reading.

Published works: Hiking Patagonia, biking Buenos Aires, and apps killing websites

Courtesy Argentina Tourism

Excluding non-bylined writings for commercial clients, here’s what I published last month:

Best of 2016 travel: Never do as the locals do, extreme theme parking, Antarctica

Here’s where my travel column went this month:

Published works: Airport tips, Disney cruises, Nevada road trip, not-so exotic vacations, and online security

Photo credit: Lindsey Snow

Photo credit: Lindsey Snow

Here’s where my travel column went last month:

Here’s what I wrote for recently:

Published works: Skydiving, Australia, computers killing writers, and battery tech


Here’s where my byline published last month:

The Network (aka Cisco magazine)

Paste Magazine

Published columns: Kid travels, universal sensations, foreign foods, paddle boarding

Credit Lindsey Snow

Credit Lindsey Snow

Here’s where my travel column went last month:

Published columns: Traveling guidebooks, nature worship, industrial views, music city

credit Lindsey Snow

credit Lindsey Snow

For those who care, here’s where my travel column went last month:

5 things I’m excited about at this point in life

Me surfing Lake Powell recently

Yours truly surfing Lake Powell

Someone recently asked me what I’m excited about. “Oh, I don’t know,” I lied. Not because I didn’t have an answer. I just hadn’t articulated it yet.

After further deliberation, here is my answer:  Continue reading…

Published columns: Americans abroad, epic inlands, Monument Valley, underrated states

Courtesy 20th Century Fox

Courtesy 20th Century Fox

Here’s where my travel column went last month:

Travel roundup: Most visited countries, foreign education, China tips, nearby snorkeling

courtesy wikimedia

Here’s where my travel column went last month. Better late than never:

Map of the day: Where in the world have I been?

courtesy travel tip

To date, I feel lucky to have visited 14 countries on five continents: United States (home), Canada, Mexico, Cayman Islands, Costa Rica, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, France, Switzerland, Italy, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. Each have touched me in a unique way. And yet I’ve only scratched the surface—just 6% of the world’s 195 countries.

Furthermore, the above map is grossly skewed. I’ve only visited two thirds of America instead of the whole she-bang (and much of that was only sections of larger states). I’ve yet to visit mainland Mexico or Canada—just Cozumel and Newfoundland (what a place!). I’ve never visited massive Asia, Eastern Europe, and 90% of the rest of Africa. And I’ve visited just one giant state (New South Wales) of the USA-sized Australia.

Granted, I have no intention of visiting every country or plot of land. It doesn’t take that many to realize we’re all the same and that we live on the most beautiful rock in the observable universe. Plus, I still have a lot I want to do in my own backyard, not to mention repeat trips abroad (i.e. New Zealand take two).

But I do hope to visit all seven continents someday, if not next year. Not only does distance makes the heart grow fonder, but a change in geography is good at keeping us on our toes.

Love you, Earth.

PS—Airplanes are amazing and travel is overrated for the following reasons.

Read this if you like money-saving adventures, inspiring islands, popular consensus, or myth-busting

credit: wikimedia commons

credit wikimedia commons

I really enjoy writing these because the subjects have nothing to do with my day job, which keeps me on my toes. Hope you have as much fun reading them as I did writing them:

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In case you missed it: offline vacations, converting cruise-haters, overlooked wonders, and dream believers



Here’s where my travel column went last month:

Pretty sure I have the best job in the world

Courtesy 20th Century Fox

Twentieth Century Fox

When I was nine years old, I saw Big starring Tom Hanks. It’s a movie about a boy doing young-at-heart things in a grown-up’s body. That and being employed to have an opinion on (i.e. review) toys.

At the time, I thought it was the coolest movie ever made. I still think it’s pretty darn cool.

In reality, my work as a writer over the last decade is not unlike protagonist Josh Baskin’s. I get paid to have an opinion and ask a bunch of questions. I tinker with ideas, learn from those who are smarter than me, and slay the dragon of misinformation with research as my shield and a keyboard as my sword.  Continue reading…

The world’s greatest inventions have one thing in common

courtesy image

courtesy image

I recently finished Highbrow’s excellent 10-day course on inventions that changed the world.

In keeping score, half of the cited inventions quickened the sharing of information (writing, printing press, telephone, personal computer, internet). A third hastened our transportation (steam engine, automobile, airplanes). One marginalizes or maximizes physical dominance, depending on who owns more of it (gunpowder). And the last one lengthens our days (light bulb).

Interestingly, every one of these inventions involve some element of speed. The speed of a bullet. The speed of light. The speed of travel. The speed of knowledge. That’s why the world moves at an increasing rate. Our greatest inventions all involve speed.

Even this century’s greatest inventions largely involve speed. How fast you can get new or old music to your ears (iTunes, Spotify). How fast you can get answers to questions (Google). How fast you can connect with friends and family (Facebook, SMS). And how fast you can see the latest cat videos (YouTube).

Of course, many of these inventions involve size, frequency, and power. But when it comes to bigger, stronger, better, and faster—always bet on faster. It’s the future. And it’s likely what the “next big thing” will do more than others.

My latest columns: Dancing Matt, big impact countries, unrecognized beauty, mind travel

I hope the below will help you travel somewhere fun.

Thanks, Paste Magazine, for letting me write these adventurous stories last month

Paramount Pictures

Off the grid: Rethinking air travel, European detours, travel blunders, and Newfoundland

Here’s where my travel column went last month:

Oh, the places you’ll go! Here’s where my travel column went last month

credit: blake snow

credit: blake snow

Perhaps one of the below might inspire your next offline adventure:

Trains, hotels, tourist traps, and bucket lists: Have you read all these?

Courtesy Fox Searchlight

Courtesy Fox Searchlight

Last month I started a travel column for Paste Magazine. Here’s what I wrote about this month:

Thanks for reading.

Will do again: 5-star swimming at a 3-star resort

courtesy photo

courtesy photo

Lindsey and I took the kids to fabulous Mesquite, Nevada last month for spring break. The city bills itself as “The way Vegas used to be.”

With only three casinos and extremely limited food options, I’m not so sure about that. But I was charmed by the place and plan on returning soon the next time I crave a desert oasis. Here’s why.  Continue reading…

Introducing “Off the Grid,” my new travel column for Paste Magazine

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

I just started a new travel column for Paste Magazine. It’s called “Off the Grid.” You should read it.

First one up: 5 overlooked National Parks. To help you along the way, I’ll follow it up every week with all things awesome.

Thanks for reading (and for sharing if you like what you read).

My latest for USA Today: Fantastic fjords of North America

Newfoundland & Labrador Tourism

Newfoundland & Labrador Tourism

An edited version of this story first appeared on USA Today

North American is known for a lot of things. Transcendent, soaring, and gaping fjords isn’t one of them. For that, most travelers understandably head to Norway, New Zealand, or Chile first—all renowned for their glacier-carved “canyons” that outlet into swallowing seas.

But the northern half of the continent has its fair share of majestic cliffs cut by frozen (instead of liquid) water, especially in parts of southern Alaska and Canada. As a bonus, they’re more proximitous than Europe’s beloved Grainger Fjord, less travelled, and still rate at least 4.5 out of 5 stars, according to average visitor reviews on Google and Tripadvisor.

Behold, the most fantastic fjords of North America: Continue reading…

Me to my wife: “We gotta go to England!”



I watched Nicholas Nickleby over the holidays with my soulmate.

It’s worth watching, at least according to this romantic. Charlie Hunnam’s performance was uneven—brilliant when confronting his uncle, not so much when mourning the death of his friend. But it was obvious to me after watching it: Charles Dickens is a masterful storyteller. He’s proved it many times over. As have his contemporaries, including Jane Austen.

Upon finishing the movie and while channeling the most formal English I could muster, I commented to my wife, “We gotta go to England! The source of such great storytelling deserves to be honored with our presence.”

Plus, I’m a sucker for Ferris wheels, and I hear London has a rather considerable one.

See also

Eight stories I wish you would read


A client recently asked for links to some of my favorite personal writings. This is what I sent him:

Photo credit: Sara Snow

Don’t retire, vacation several times a year until you die

I have never believed in traditional retirement, the complete withdrawal from one’s occupation, business, or office near the end of one’s life. It’s a pipe dream. As millions of ex-retirees quickly realize after an uneventful year on the beach, idleness never was happiness.

But leisure and periodic breaks from work are an important part of life. When used properly, regular vacations can inspire and rejuvenate a willingness to work harder. And contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to be rich or wait until the end of your life to vacation. Here’s how: Continue reading…

Places I’d like to visit: Crater Lake

photo credit: random stranger

photo credit: random stranger

UPDATE: Visited in 2014. ORIGINAL STORY: I remember seeing this marvel in an early Bond movie as a young boy. Apparently, it’s the deepest lake in America. Not only that, but it’s strikingly beautiful. Any readers ever been? It’s only an 11 hour drive from my house. (Asks wife if we can go this summer.)